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1 guest@cc 2019-09-28T11:47:49 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: kangz.jpg (JPEG, 94.63 KB, 1028x766)
what type of computer can kill a nigger instantly
2 posts omitted
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4 guest@cc 2019-09-28T18:55:25
depends from what height you can drop you're computer, but 500G should be enough. I'd get a 1KG one just to be sure though
unless you know kendo of course
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5 guest@cc 2019-09-29T03:40:36
>>3
Holy fuck this game
https://youtu.be/vW674z8q9l4
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6 guest@cc 2019-09-29T03:46:14
Anything with a command line only interface.
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7 guest@cc 2019-09-29T09:13:10
>>6
But anybody would fall to that. Apple's popular for a reason.
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8 guest@cc 2019-09-29T14:58:54
>>7
I don’t think Apple’s really that popular in the computer space, Windows would’ve been a better example. (Which has been falling towards the CLI with 10 and PowerShell).


1 guest@cc 2019-02-24T19:19:44
Just got myself a refurbished EliteDesk 705 G1 SFF for cheap, the first non-laptop computer I've bought thus far. It's pretty bare bones, didn't even come with an Operating System, but that's exactly what I was looking for. I wanted to have a box so I could work on making myself properly computer literate, as well as making a workstation for doing creative(Illustration, Video editing) work on.

Right now my first step was to put Ubuntu on there to see if it was working right, but I'm still figuring out what to do with it from there. The box didn't come with a Wi-fi card, so I was considering making an offline copy of the repository for fun. What would you Sprouts suggest be done with this blank box?
4 posts omitted
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6 guest@cc 2019-03-29T12:37:11
HP Anon again.
I'm still playing around with my system, and getting comfortable with the Debian OS. I'm still working offline, but was fortunate to run in to some useful commands/scripts to use the ISO files provided on the Debian site as repositories. This helped get the productivity programs I'm used to using easily, as well as testing stuff I don't use too often. I also went ahead and grabbed the Testing and non-Free ISOs to get some more recent stuff and AMD firmware. It seems I may have to jump in to compiling from source to get more exotic packages or games though. I've also read about apt-get offline, and that may be helpful if dependency hunting gets to be too absurd in some cases.

The first minor upgrade I had to make to the box is to get a video card. The integrated graphics unit couldn't handle Krita, and while it worked well enough for MyPaint, I didn't want to find myself running in to a wall productivity wise. At the same time I'm tight on cash, and could not afford to splurge on graphics units. So I went and grabbed an R7 240 low profile card, since it was under $100 and fit my computer. I later read/watched about how the card was terribad and couldn't run GTA V at 1080p. Fortunately for my case, I didn't invest in AAA gaming at all, so not being able to play Rise of the Tomb Raider isn't a problem.

The next few things I want to get for it are:
- a CPU upgrade, looking at the Athlong X4 845 for a reasonable amount of cores for graphic tasks.
- 500gb SSD
- Maybe some RAM. 8gb seems to be the golden number, but you never know.

I'm projecting the total cost of the computer and upgrades will come to $300. I don't think it's a bad hit, but someone more experienced could cut the cost more. I have to start somewhere~
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7 guest@cc 2019-03-29T15:34:35
>a CPU upgrade
What sort have you got now?

>500gb SSD

SSDs are a complete meme. Go for at least a 1TB HDD instead, it'll be cheaper. Reliability isn't a problem at all if you back up, and a shitty one should last for at least 5 years.

>Maybe some RAM.

8gb is generally considered the ideal nowadays, but as long as you get rid of the few hungry processes you'll probably have running in the background of this pre-configured system, you should easily be able to make do with just 2gb. Not even saying that to seem like some kind of hacker elite or anything, 2gb can be enough for most purposes, even emulated games going up to the N64/Playstation. The speed they work at could be a bottleneck though, if you can't run Krita properly. I don't know whether you can get small ones that work fast.
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8 guest@cc 2019-03-29T18:20:28
>>7
>What sort have you got now?

An A6-7400b.
I have a i5 laptop and it runs fine there, but ran slow on the PC prior to slapping a video card on there. Not sure whether the issue is the chip or the way the software is built, but I assumed I would run in to issues later anyway.

> SSDs are a complete meme

It's kind of sad that they seem near necessary to run Windows 10 (And another reason I cling to 7). I popped one in my Laptop and was charmed by how quick it booted up, but my Linux partition was already snappy to begin with.

I have a base urge to get all I can out of this old hardware. You can say I'm having fun tweaking things to my liking, as I'm doing such to the OS. I got a book/pdf full to info on the shell which I'm going to be reading a lot of too. I still a bit of a Windows kid so I can get lazy with the OS at times, but I legit feel excited about how much of the OS' vital systems are out in the open.
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9 guest@cc 2019-08-30T14:37:33 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: img_eggsif_6505642235988211054… (JPEG, 1004.12 KB, 3264x2448)
Greetings!
HP anon from a few months back. Since my last post, I've been slowly upgrading and playing around with the box, grabbing what I need based on the work I intend it to do with it. That is, until I fried the motherboard due to getting impatient while upgrading my GPU. The prebuilt itself was cheap enough that I could replace the box for ~$45, but instead I decided to stop being cowardly, and just build one using the parts I had built up over the months.

Specs:
ASRock FM2A88X Pro3+
EVGA 500BT PSU
Athlon X4 845
Radeon Pro wx4100
24 GB RAM (I had a lot of left over RAM sticks)
250GB SSD
3.5TB or HDD space total
DELL E2216H Monitor
DEEPCOOL Tesseract BF Case

I still have a few more components coming, but this box is close to complete. I want to use this box to start digging in to heavier multimedia creation, beyond drawing and in to animation and video editing. Nothing absurd like 4-8K resolution stuff, but I wanted to have enough computing muscle to have wiggle room with what I could do while not starting a house fire.
I did not trust myself to not destroy a computer when just starting out with a pre-build, but now I feel silly, since tue buiding process turned out to be easy. I would have saved a few bucks too. Still, it was a fun experience, and I'm glad I built this box. Hopefully I can keep working with it for some years before it becomes obsolete.
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10 guest@cc 2019-08-30T22:06:08
>>9
Nice.


1 guest@cc 2019-08-21T11:38:31 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: a386e.jpg (JPEG, 6.94 KB, 344x205)
http://eji.com/a86/index.htm


1 guest@cc 2019-08-04T05:56:37 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: 02A72838-E0DC-4758-8AAE-6D72EB… (JPEG, 50.77 KB, 680x500)
It has occurred to me that I don’t actually know how the internet works, despite spending a lot of time on it. I tried to read some RFC things, and I can’t understand anything. I know about as much as one would from installing gentoo, what do I do
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2 guest@cc 2019-08-04T08:23:07
There's https://github.com/alex/what-happens-when, "What happens when you type google.com into your browser's address box and press enter?"


1 guest@cc 2019-06-26T13:50:44 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: 2019-06-20-010726_334x419_scro… (PNG, 168.9 KB, 334x419)
Language based interfaces(Shell language+utils, things like lisp environments, etc) are usually preferable to graphical interfaces for the same reason standard musical notation is preferable to tab notation. Its usually better to be able to just say what you mean than to have to demonstrate it.
8 posts omitted
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10 guest@cc 2019-06-27T01:03:18
In my experience text based applications are far more "standardized" than GUI ones.
There's basically 2 or 3 main keybinding sets that get reused (vi, emacs, and just your basic dumb arrow-key navigations)
Once you get comfortable with those then you can almost use any CLI interface.

They also tend to share the same optional flags (e.g. -h, -v, -r, etc), and share the same escape codes and such.
From what I can tell "learning" GUI's is like re-learning every single individual application and there's not a lot of overlap.
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11 guest@cc 2019-06-27T19:58:53
Didn’t Lisp machines already have a graphical interface?
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12 guest@cc 2019-06-27T20:11:14
>>11
so did UNIX with X, and plan 9 after it. Its not mutually exclusive. I say its better for most daily tasks, not that you should uninstall your window system and live like stallman.
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13 guest@cc 2019-06-28T15:37:39
>>12
My happy medium is to run PekWM so I can multitask and run applications like with a traditional WIMP interface, but to use xterm as my file manager, program launcher, text editor, ect.
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14 guest@cc 2019-06-28T22:33:13
>>13
Thats what I meant.


1 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: testcolor.png (PNG, 9.87 KB, 484x316)
What sort of X resources tricks do you guys do?
*Color15: orange
Some servers I connect to try to send me explicitly white text, so I recolor it as orange so it doesn't become invisible. As you can see, it only remaps the white from the 16-color set, not the 256-color set.
I'm also considering making xterm open by default as 160 x 48.
1 posts omitted
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2 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00
If you don't know what X resources are, you can see what yours are currently set to with xrdb -query and set it just by putting stuff into the standard input of xrdb alone.
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3 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00
I don't really have any "tricks", but I've just set the font, size, disabled the scrollbar for urxvt and remapped all the standard 16 colors. Also despite some terminals defaulting to white backgrounds it seems that dark backgrounds are actually considered to be more of a standard for some reason. Which is probably why you get things sending you white text, just assuming you'll have a dark background that it'll show up on.
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4 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00
>>3
>but I've just set the font, size, disabled the scrollbar for urxvt and remapped all the standard 16 colors

Post it!
>it seems that dark backgrounds are actually considered to be more of a standard for some reason

Probably IBM PC and DOS users being in charge of picking colors. But exactly that, yes.
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5 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: colors.png (PNG, 9.26 KB, 576x89)
>>4
https://paste.pound-python.org/show/c6ptRBW8R8mPDMQI3RaT/
Like I said, it's really plain. The only thing interesting about it is I spent quite a while trying to choose colors that contrasted as much as possible, so any color could be read on any background. It's a lot harder than you'd think.
It could probably still use some tweaking but every time you get one combination right it ruins 2 others. Also I still need to work on the brights.
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7 guest@cc 2019-06-17T12:27:43
>>3
>>4
It comes from the way that the oldschool dedicated terminals worked. Most of them only illuminated the text because 1=on and 0=off, so it follows that 1 should be used for illuminated pixels and 0 should be used for pixels that aren't.

Doing it the other way, having 1=off or ink and 0=on or paper, didn't show up until somewhere around the 80s as computers began entering the home, where the paper metaphor made more sense


1 guest@cc 2019-05-31T21:16:30 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: amiga-song.png (PNG, 36.06 KB, 847x475)
I want to fuck an amiga
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2 guest@cc 2019-06-01T00:43:29
Where would you even stick your dick?
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3 guest@cc 2019-06-02T17:07:17
>>2
12-pin serial port


1 guest@cc 2019-05-24T18:25:44 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: error.jpg (PNG, 39.37 KB, 781x340)
100.
That is all.
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2 guest@cc 2019-05-28T16:45:17
So it actually frees up hard drive space! neat!


1 guest@cc 2019-05-24T20:26:58
>"Computer Club"
>Server with .py scripts: https://github.com/4taba/4taba
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2 guest@cc 2019-05-24T21:16:41
I get the feeling OP is trying to imply something
but I'm not sure what


1 guest@cc 2018-06-18T00:15:45
>Google Docs don't take up Google Drive space
>encode file as base64

>script to insert into Doc

>script to download and decode Doc

>Profit
9 posts omitted
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11 guest@cc 2019-05-17T21:15:59
Oh, interesting to see that you implemented this. What API limits did you have to work around? Have you uploaded any large files?
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12 guest@cc 2019-05-17T22:10:22
>>11
Oh, it's not my work; I'm not that smart. I think it's great that someone else not only had the same idea, but also implemented it.
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13 guest@cc 2019-05-17T22:13:52
Apparently, there's also https://github.com/PeterTheHe/Unlimited-Drive-Storage, which dates to 2017.
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14 guest@cc 2019-05-17T23:08:32
Dead link for me.
Anonymous (Sat)May 18 2019 07:55:43
A comma got subsumed into the link. Text processing is hart.
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15 guest@cc 2019-05-18T16:46:44
>>7
Work stuff, sadly.


1 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: Macintosh-Plus.jpg (JPEG, 81.3 KB, 1000x892)
Does making software for weaker machines ever pay off?
I feel like modern software is bloated, but on the other hand, if I were to make light software, very little amount of people would appreciate that.
18 posts omitted
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20 guest@cc 2019-05-01T21:36:03
>>19
UNIX with as much lisp as possible thrown in is not a lisp OS, any more than windows with cygwin is UNIX or any OS running a web browser is a javascript system.
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21 guest@cc 2019-05-01T22:01:54
>>20
Then I wonder if there are any somewhat modern kernels out there which are written in lisp
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22 guest@cc 2019-05-01T23:09:43
>>21
>Then I wonder if there are any somewhat modern kernels out there which are written in lis

No, the problem with that first suggestion isn't that the linux kernel isn't written in lisp. A UNIX kernel written in lisp wouldn't be a 'lisp OS' in the sense that anon was pining for either.
Or else, if you werent implying unix, the question is meaningless, like asking about an engine without a car, on the topic of the car.
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23 guest@cc 2019-05-02T01:38:32
Might as well try using emacs as an OS.
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24 guest@cc 2019-05-11T11:20:16
>>21
https://github.com/froggey/Mezzano


1 guest@cc 2019-04-25T06:37:58 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: 97879808.png (PNG, 135.11 KB, 1112x669)
What are you going to do when support gets cut?
9 posts omitted
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11 guest@cc 2019-04-27T23:31:23
>>10
That's capitalism.
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12 guest@cc 2019-04-28T12:46:19
>>11
And yet anti-monopoly bureaus are a fairly common thing in the world. Not to mention that MS has been known for shady or outright illegal practices when it comes to "incentivizing". If they were competing fairly it wouldn't have been a problem. I'm not saying they are the literal spawn of Satan, but mere competition and protection of investments and/or properties is not a sufficient defense of their MO.
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13 guest@cc 2019-05-04T10:09:24
>>9
>If they haven't released XP why would they release 7.


It hasn't been 20 years since XP end of service.
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14 guest@cc 2019-05-04T11:01:09
install freebsd
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15 guest@cc 2019-05-04T18:23:10
By that time I'll probably play around with some other OS.


1 guest@cc 1969-12-31T17:00:00
we've all heard about cyberpunk and cipherpunk, but here's something new:

textpunk.

That's right. Textpunk

Newspaper articles, BBSs (like this one), IRC, ASCII art, Kopipe, program source code, Novels, View HTML source, Google search engine, Mathematics, Hieroglyphics, The Rosetta Stone, Gutenberg Bible...

A textpunk doesn't sit there waiting for information to be slowly fed to him drip at a time by the gogglebox. A textpunk is thirsty for knowledge and 100% focused - they read old school hacker textfile zines. They don't waste their time with lame imageboarders: instead they're doing crazy abstract shitposting on /prog/ with thoughts and concepts twisted up so with many levels of irony that it becomes an art form.

Textpunks recognize and understand the true power of kopipe - how a well crafted piece of text can be so damn powerful that it alone can trigger thousands of replies with so much veracity within days. They see through things down into the core of what really counts, everything in the computer is built of text, ascii, strings of bits - They don't care about the latest 3D GUI environment fads. No, that's just a distraction. 7-bit clean ascii program source code. That's textpunk.

Look at how text has shaped humanity: The birth of writing systems was correlated with some of fastest advances of science and technology in early human history. Mass production of the Bible took power away from a few select monks and democratized paving the way for people to start thinking for themselves. Programming is text and it's the closest thing there is in the world to true wizardy and spell casting. Talking about real SICP-type programming here, not that modern garbage.

Today textpunks build up digital libraries of books and stick it to the copyright cartel. Schwarz, lib gen, the gentoomen library, and so many anonymous sources that tireless scan and collect books.. Textpunks are the people in tune with modern digital society of ultrafast cost-free transmission of text, they're the ones rethinking and revolutionizing publishing mixing it with open rights and making works available online.
34 posts omitted
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36 guest@cc 2018-06-01T20:23:15
>>35
Damn, seconding this. I might even see if I can contribute some edits.
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37 guest@cc 2019-04-26T14:34:42
do we have an IRC
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38 guest@cc 2019-04-26T19:13:26
>>37
#4taba at Rizon. It's just been me and this other guy sitting around in there forever though.
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39 guest@cc 2019-04-29T06:39:26
>>38
For why?
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40 guest@cc 2019-04-29T18:59:21
>>39
For lols


1 guest@cc 2019-04-07T04:57:35
"cat" should fail if only one filename is provided.
Discuss.
5 posts omitted
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7 guest@cc 2019-04-07T10:26:56
Why is printing to stdout incorrect?
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8 guest@cc 2019-04-07T10:53:04
>>7
Something excruciatingly pedantic, I garuntee you. Maybe he thinks its wrong that it assumes you always want to concatenate to stdout.
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9 guest@cc 2019-04-07T20:01:51
People will then just cat < file instead of cat file.
There's nothing wrong with using cat instead of more to view a short file.
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10 guest@cc 2019-04-07T20:26:51
in my opinion, the UNIX guys shouldn't have called in "cat" in the first place. that title describes its intended function, not the program's actual function.
but I guess we can't really go back in time just to make a stupid change like that
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11 guest@cc 2019-04-07T21:00:02
>>9
Theres no reason pager programs should exist on graphical systems.
Terminals scrolling down to simulate the output of hardcopy terminals is outdated and has no reason to exist anymore. Plan9 gets this right. You cat a file and just page down in the window with your arrow keys.
You can set the terminal to scroll if you really want to, but its often better not to.


1 guest@cc 2019-04-02T07:40:48 [ImgOps] [iqdb]
File: 1460000816396.jpg (JPEG, 269.84 KB, 739x734)
/g/ bitches about it in package golf dick measuring contests, but honestly, arch has entirely the right idea what with putting the headers and such in every package. any time I want to compile something myself and its /never/ adequately explained beyond 'qt' or just no explanation, its a pain in the ass to look around for the development files for shit I already have installed
2 posts omitted
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4 guest@cc 2019-04-02T13:45:16
>>3
well they use it to refer to a number of different things, some of which are more important than other.
But using less disk space isn't a reduction in resource use or complexity, though.
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5 guest@cc 2019-04-02T15:13:09
>>1
Why do girls do that?
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6 guest@cc 2019-04-02T23:11:24
>>5
It gets boring waiting in the car while mom gets the groceries
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8 guest@cc 2019-04-06T19:24:39
It's the same on all the BSDs. There are no separate -dev or -doc packages like what Debian does: if you install a package, it comes with everything you might want to use it for..
I agree with OP. I hate doing development on GNU/Linux.
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7 guest@cc 2019-04-05T06:56:34
>>5
BRRRRRRRRRAAAAAAAAAAAPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPTTTTTT
Anonymous (Mon)Apr 08 2019 02:48:45
Based brapposter

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